Get lost, I'm busy daydreaming here...

GeckoGirl

751 notes


"We’re so comfortable that we can rely on each other to get each other through. When we were doing the scene in the pilot where Taylor did the strip dance in the bedroom, our director at the time, Michael Trim, explained our relationship like I’m the spider and she’s the fly. I lure her in and we have this tumultuous crazy relationship, but as the first season progressed, you saw those roles shift." - Laura Prepon

"We’re so comfortable that we can rely on each other to get each other through. When we were doing the scene in the pilot where Taylor did the strip dance in the bedroom, our director at the time, Michael Trim, explained our relationship like I’m the spider and she’s the fly. I lure her in and we have this tumultuous crazy relationship, but as the first season progressed, you saw those roles shift." - Laura Prepon

(Source: missdontcare-x, via bound-for-life-00007)

180 notes

Have you ever seen a pair of trees grow together? There are places where you can see that they are separate, distinct plants, but their trunks and branches wind around each other and their roots are so tangled up you can’t tell where one ends and the other begins. Neither started out needing the other; they were growing just fine on their own. But they’ve knit themselves together, and changed their shapes so that you can’t take one away without losing a piece of the other. Lena wants to cling to this baby, this tiny sapling she’s been growing for twenty weeks. But Stef, as much as she loves the promise of little Frankie, she can only see the ripping, the tearing, and the pain of losing the woman around whom she has grown her entire life.
The most beautiful description of Stef and Lena, and love in general, I’ve ever read. From Lucy Hallowell’s AfterEllen recap of 2x06 [Mother] (via lifesizehysteria)

328 notes

miszshari:

#Repost from @jloyden with @repostapp —- I pledge to raise awareness for domestic violence… To honor my family and in remembrance of my beautiful sister Britton. #MYvoicecounts @jl_foundation

miszshari:

#Repost from @jloyden with @repostapp —- I pledge to raise awareness for domestic violence… To honor my family and in remembrance of my beautiful sister Britton. #MYvoicecounts @jl_foundation

(via livinlifeyeahh)

27,049 notes

Anonymous asked: Towards the whole "pronouns hurt people's feelings" topic. Am I REALLY the only person on the planet that thinks people are becoming far to sensative? Nearly to the point that they shouldn't leave their little home bubbles in the case that a bird chirps next to them in a way that sounds like a mean word. Maybe, JUST MAYBE, we're becoming a little TOO coddling and people need to learn to deal with simplistic shit like words. And yes, I've been insulted and made fun of. I got over it. So can you.

thefrogman:

Supposedly invented by the Chinese, there is an ancient form of torture that is nothing more than cold, tiny drops falling upon a person’s forehead. 

On its own, a single drop is nothing. It falls upon the brow making a tiny splash. It doesn’t hurt. No real harm comes from it. 

In multitudes, the drops are still fairly harmless. Other than a damp forehead, there really is no cause for concern. 

The key to the torture is being restrained. You cannot move. You must feel each drop. You have lost all control over stopping these drops of water from splashing on your forehead. 

It still doesn’t seem like that big of a deal. But person after person, time and time again—would completely unravel psychologically. They all had a breaking point where each drop turned into a horror. Building and building until all sense of sanity was completely lost. 

"It was just a joke, quite being so sensitive."

"They used the wrong pronoun, big deal."

"So your parents don’t understand, it could be worse."

Day after day. Drop after drop. It builds up. A single instance on its own is no big deal. A few drops, not a problem. But when you are restrained, when you cannot escape the drops, when it is unending—these drops can be agony. 

People aren’t sensitive because they can’t take a joke. Because they can’t take being misgendered one time. Because they lack a thick skin. 

People are sensitive because the drops are unending and they have no escape from them. 

You are only seeing the tiny, harmless, single drop hitting these so-called “sensitive” people. You are failing to see the thousands of drops endured before that. You are failing to see the restraints that make them inescapable.